Cherry and Wild Arugula Salad | CUESA

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Cherry and Wild Arugula Salad

Source:

Christopher Thompson, A16

This recipe was demonstrated for CUESA’s Market to Table program on May 3, 2014.

Serves 8

INGREDIENTS

Citronette Dressing
1 small red onion
2 lemons
Sea salt
¾ cup extra-virgin olive oil

Salad
½ cup shelled pistachios
½ pound pitted cherries
⅛ pound bresaola
1 head frisée
1 pound wild arugula
Sea salt
½ pound Achadinha Capricious or other aged goat cheese

PREPARATION

1.    Finely mince the red onion and transfer to a small mixing bowl. Squeeze the juice of the lemons over the onions, trapping and removing any seeds that may fall into the bowl. Lightly season with sea salt. Stir together and allow the onions to soak in the juice for about 30 minutes.

2.    Toast the pistachios for 10-15 minutes in a preheated oven at 350 degrees. Allow to cool to room temperature and chop roughly.

3.    While your onions are soaking, stem, rinse and pit the cherries (using a cherry pitter, olive pitter or paring knife).

4.    Thinly slice the bresaola (or have your favorite deli do it ahead of time for you!)

5.    Cut off the green tips from the frisée (as they tend to be bitter), cut off the root end and reserve the white and yellow portions of the leaves.

6.    Whisk the olive oil into the lemon and onion mixture at a ratio of 4:1 oil to acid.

7.    Rinse and dry the wild arugula in a salad spinner.

8.    Toss the arugula, cherries and frisée together in a large mixing bowl. Dress lightly with the citronette and season with sea salt.

9.    Compose your salad plates by scattering a few slices of the bresaola, top with dressed greens and cherry mix, and sprinkle with the chopped pistachios. Grate the cheese over the top.

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CUESA (Center for Urban Education about Sustainable Agriculture) is dedicated to cultivating a sustainable food system through the operation of farmers markets and educational programs. Learn More »