Crispy Gluten-Free Pizza with Basil Pesto | CUESA

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Crispy Gluten-Free Pizza with Basil Pesto

Source:

Amy Fothergill, The Warm Kitchen

This recipe was demonstrated for CUESA’s Market to Table program on May 31, 2014.

Gluten-Free Pizza Dough 

Makes 2 large (12-inch), 4 medium, or 6 to 8 personal pizzas

EQUIPMENT

Parchment paper
Pizza peel
Pizza stones
1 to 2 wire cooling racks

INGREDIENTS

2½ cups Amy’s Gluten-Free Flour Blend (see recipe below)
½ cup sorghum flour
4½ teaspoons active dry yeast (2 packets)
1 tablespoon xanthan gum
1 teaspoon sea salt or kosher salt
1⅓ cups warm water (120 to 130°F)
1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar or distilled white vinegar
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 tablespoon honey or agave nectar
Pizza toppings (see recipe below)

PREPARATION

1.    Place one or two pizza stones in the oven. If you don’t have pizza stones, you can use baking sheets (preferably perforated), but do not preheat them. Preheat the oven to 450°F for at least 15 minutes before you are ready to bake the pizzas.

2.    Add the flours, yeast, and xanthan gum to the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment. Mix the ingredients thoroughly on low speed. Add the hot water, vinegar, oil and sweetener. Mix for 30 seconds. Raise the speed to medium and mix for 2 to 3 minutes. The dough will be sticky/tacky, but will almost form a ball.

3.    Once you have decided how many pizzas you want to make, cut that many pieces of parchment paper slightly smaller than the pizza stone or baking sheet. Place one of the pieces of paper on top of the pizza peel and place the rest on your counter. Grease your hands or a scooper and divide the dough onto the prepared parchment sheets. If the dough feels very sticky, sprinkle 1 tablespoon of the gluten-free flour blend on top of the dough and pat it down.

4.    Oil your hands liberally. Working with one piece of dough at a time, pat it into a circle. The dough should be about ¼ inch thick. Fold the edges toward the center to form an outside crust. Prick it all over with a fork to prevent uneven rising and bubbles.

5.    Carefully slide the crust and parchment paper off the pizza peel and onto the pizza stone. Bake the crusts for 6 to 8 minutes, or until they are just getting browned on the edges and on the top. The dough should be a little puffy. Remove the crust from the oven, peel off the parchment, and place the crust on a wire rack to cool.

6.    When you have added your desired toppings, place the pizza in the oven and cook for 12 to 15 minutes, or until the crust is brown and the cheese is melted. Cool for 3 to 5 minutes before eating.

Amy’s Gluten-Free Flour Blend

Makes 6 cups

INGREDIENTS

3 cups brown rice flour
1 cup millet flour (if you can’t find or don’t want to use millet flour, substitute with brown or white rice flour instead)
1 cup tapioca flour or starch
1 cup potato starch (not flour)

1. Mix together and keep in an air tight container.

Basil Pesto

Makes about 1½ cups

INGREDIENTS

2 cups fresh basil leaves, or 1 cup fresh basil and 1 cup spinach leaves
½ cup pine nuts or walnuts, toasted
½ cup grated Parmigiano-Reggiano
½ cup grated Pecorino Romano
1 to 2 cloves garlic, chopped
¼ teaspoon salt
¼ to ½ cup olive oil

 PREPARATION

1.    In a food processor, pulse the basil (make sure it’s dry before you process it).

2.    Add the nuts, cheeses, garlic and salt, and ¼ cup of the olive oil and purée. Add more oil, if needed, to produce a paste consistency.

3. Leftovers should be preserved by pouring a layer of oil over the top to prevent browning. Keep refrigerated.

Dairy-free variation: Omit the Italian cheeses. Replace them with 1 teaspoon lemon juice and ½ teaspoon Dijon mustard. Add an additional ¼ teaspoon salt.

Photo by Jennifer Kregear.

About CUESA

CUESA (Center for Urban Education about Sustainable Agriculture) is dedicated to cultivating a sustainable food system through the operation of farmers markets and educational programs. Learn More »