Grilled Quail Stuffed with Goat Cheese, Wild Mushroom Salad, Capellini Frittata and Asparagus | CUESA

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Grilled Quail Stuffed with Goat Cheese, Wild Mushroom Salad, Capellini Frittata and Asparagus

Source:

Mark May, Executive Chef, The Lone Eagle Grille.

This recipe was demonstrated on March 7, 2009.

Serves 12
  

INGREDIENTS

Quail
1 pound fresh local goat cheese
12 semi-boneless quail (ask your butcher to do this for you)
Freshly cracked black pepper
12 sprigs rosemary
5 stalks green garlic, minced and divided
1 cup extra virgin olive oil

Mushroom salad
1 cup extra virgin olive oil plus scant tablespoon, divided
2 pounds assorted mushrooms, cleaned and torn or sliced as needed to ensure they are all the same size
4 large shallots, thinly sliced
4 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
2 teaspoons coriander seeds
1 tsp coarsely ground black pepper, plus more to taste
½ cup dried cherries
1 cup cider vinegar
 Salt

Frittata
½ cup half and half
2 eggs
4 tablespoons grated Andante pecorino cheese
2 tablespoons minced chives
Salt and pepper, to taste
½ pound cooked capellini pasta
Olive oil to cook the frittata

To finish and plate
2-3 bunches pencil-thin asparagus, blanched  (this can be done directly before serving or ahead of time and reheated gently in warm water when ready to plate)
1 tablespoon minced chives
  

PREPARATION

For the quail
Divide the goat cheese into 12 small balls.  Blot the quail dry and remove the outer two wing joints.  Place one round of goat cheese in the cavity of each quail and season with pepper. Pour a bit of olive oil into a container large enough to marinate the quail in overnight. Place 4 sprigs of rosemary and some of the green garlic in the oil and add 4 quail in a single layer on top. Cover with oil and 4 more sprigs rosemary and green garlic. Repeat the process until all the quail are layered with the rosemary and oil.  Top with rosemary, green garlic and the rest of the oil. Cover and refrigerate overnight. 

For the mushroom salad
Heat a large sauté pan over high heat.  Add a tablespoon of olive oil, heat until shimmery and sauté mushrooms until tender.  Reserve the oil in the pan and remove the mushrooms to a large bowl.  Bring the pan to medium heat, add the cup of olive oil and sauté the shallots and garlic, being careful to cook slowly so they do not burn.  Add the coriander, pepper and dried cherries.  Cook, stirring for about a minute. Add the cider vinegar and salt to taste.  Pour this mixture directly over the mushrooms and cover.  Allow to sit overnight.

For the frittata
Preheat oven to 200 degrees in a mixing bowl, whisk the half and half, egg, parmesan, chives and salt and pepper till homogenous. Add the cappelini and mix together. Heat a nonstick pan with a little oil.  Pull half the noodles from the egg mixture and cook until golden brown. Flip and cook until light brown the other side.  Remove the frittata from the pan to a cutting board and cut into six pieces. Repeat the previous step to make the second frittata.   Keep warm in the oven while grilling the quail.

To finish
Remove the quail from the refrigerator and allow to sit at room temperature to take the chill off. In the meantime, light a grill to medium-high heat.  Season with salt and place the quail skin side down on the grill;  cook until nicely browned on one side, 4 to 5 minutes. Turn and press the outer portions together to give the bodies more of their original shape. Let cook 4 to 5 minutes on the second side, or until the desired doneness is reached.

Warm the mushroom salad and vinaigrette gently in a sauté pan. Fan equal amounts asparagus each onto 12 plates.  Place a slice of the frittata on top of the asparagus and then the mushrooms. Drizzle the plate with the vinaigrette.  Top one of the  quail, chives and serve.

 

Photo by Barry Jan.

 

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