Late Summer Crostini Trio | CUESA

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Late Summer Crostini Trio

Source:

Rocky Maselli, A16 Rockridge

This recipe was demonstrated for CUESA’s Market to Table program on August 23, 2014.
    
Serves 4 to 6 each as an appetizer

Local Anchovy and Heirloom Tomato Crostini

INGREDIENTS

1 pound small anchovies, heads removed
1 sprig Italian parsley
1 clove garlic
2 lemons, juiced
Colatura (Italian anchovy sauce), to taste
6 to 8 slices rustic bread
Olive oil
4 medium heirloom tomatoes, sliced
Sea salt

PREPARATION

1.    Clean the anchovies by opening them like a book. Debone them one at a time by putting them on a cutting board belly side down and pressing along the backbone with your thumb, then turn them over and remove the bones by snipping them with scissors at the tail end and pulling away from the body. Arrange them skin side down in a shallow dish.

2.    Finely chop the parsley and garlic together and place in a small bowl. Add the lemon juice and colatura to taste. The colatura is concentrated in flavor, so add a little at a time to achieve a nice balance of acid and salt. Pour the mixture over the fish, cover with plastic, and marinate in the refrigerator for a few hours.

3.    Preheat the oven to 350°F. Drizzle the bread slices with olive oil, place them on a wire rack inside a half sheet pan, and toast until golden, about 10 minutes.

4.    Place a few slices of tomato and a few marinated anchovy fillets on each toasted slice of bread, drizzle with olive oil, sprinkle with sea salt, and serve.

Marinated Pepper and Burrata Crostini

INGREDIENTS

1 medium red onion, sliced
¼ cup capers
1 clove garlic, sliced thinly
12 peppers (such as Jimmy Nardello, Goat Horn, or Gypsy), cut into strips (seeds and membrane removed)
⅛ teaspoon red pepper flakes
Sea salt
Olive oil
2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
1 sprig parsley, chopped
1 sprig oregano or marjoram, chopped
6 to 8 slices rustic bread
8 ounces burrata

PREPARATION

1.    Preheat the oven to 400°F.

2.    Combine onion, capers, garlic, and pepper flakes in a bowl and mix.

3.    Season the fresh peppers with salt and toss them with enough olive oil to coat them. Spread the peppers out on a half sheet pan, sprinkle the onion-caper-garlic mixture over the top and roast in the oven for 8 to 10 minutes, or until the edges of the peppers get slightly crispy and brown. Remove the peppers from the oven and place them in a bowl. Add the red wine vinegar, chopped parsley, oregano and a little more olive oil. Toss until coated and adjust the seasoning with salt if needed.

4.    Lower the oven temperature to 350°F. Drizzle the bread with olive oil, transfer to a wire rack set inside a half sheet pan, and toast until golden, about 10 minutes.

5.    Divide the burrata into as many portions as you have pieces of toast. Spoon the burrata onto the toast and spread it out to the edges. Season the burrata with salt, add the marinated peppers, and serve.

Fig, Corn, and Pecorino Crostini

INGREDIENTS

1 pint green or black figs, cut into quarters or smaller (depending on the size of the figs)
3 to 4 ears corn, cut off the cob
1 shallot, sliced thinly
Leaves from 1 sprig thyme
2 tablespoons white wine vinegar
Olive oil
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
6 to 8 slices rustic bread
3 ounces Achadinha Capricious or pecorino cheese, shaved

PREPARATION

1.    Cut the figs into quarters and place in a mixing bowl. Add the corn, shallot, thyme leaves, vinegar, and olive oil, and season with salt and pepper.

2.   Preheat the oven to 350°F. Drizzle the bread with olive oil, transfer to a wire rack set inside a half sheet pan, and toast until golden, about 10 minutes.

3.    Top the toasted bread with the corn and fig mixture. Garnish with shaved pecorino cheese and serve.

About CUESA

CUESA (Center for Urban Education about Sustainable Agriculture) is dedicated to cultivating a sustainable food system through the operation of farmers markets and educational programs. Learn More »