Radish, Rhubarb, and Strawberry Salad | CUESA

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Radish, Rhubarb, and Strawberry Salad

Source:

Louisa Shafia, The New Persian Kitchen

This recipe was demonstrated for CUESA’s Market to Table program on May 4, 2013.
                                                     
According to Persian folklore, the first man and woman sprang forth from the rosy red stalks of the rhubarb plant. Although Americans tend to think of it as a fruit, rhubarb is a vegetable, mainly used in Iranian cooking to add sourness to savory dishes. Strawberries, which came to Persia from the West, are known as toot farangi, or “foreign berry,” and in this lively salad they temper the rhubarb’s acidic edge. Spicy radishes complete this scarlet trio, while a scattering of pistachios lends it a dramatic finish. Once dressed, serve the salad immediately.

Serves 4

INGREDIENTS

2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar, divided
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided
1 clove garlic, finely minced   
4 cups loosely packed torn salad
1 large handful fresh spearmint
Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

1 rhubarb stalk, thinly shaved
5 radishes, thinly shaved
1 cup strawberries, hulled and quartered
Toasted pistachios, for garnish

PREPARATION
 
1.    In a large bowl, whisk 1 tablespoon of the vinegar and 2 tablespoons of the oil with the garlic. Add the greens and mint and toss to coat. Season with salt and pepper, and portion onto plates.

2.    In the same bowl, combine the rhubarb, radishes, and strawberries. Drizzle with the remaining 1 tablespoon vinegar and 1 tablespoon oil, and season with salt and pepper. Mix well and spoon over the greens.

3.    Top with the pistachios, and serve immediately.

Visit Louisa Shafia at www.lucidfood.com.

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